Saturday, September 30, 2017

Saturday Morning Cult-TV Blogging: The Bugaloos (1970): "The Bugaloo Bugaboo"


In “The Bugaloo Bugaboo,” Sparky (Billy Barty) grows depressed because he has received no mail from Gina Lolla Wattage, who is away on tour. 

Sparky feels he must do something to impress her, and decides that he should become a song-writer.
Hoping to help, the Bugaloos help Sparky compose a song, and it proves to be a hit.

The success of the song goes to Sparky’s head, and Benita seizes an opportunity. Believing that he is “the genius behind the Bugaloos,” she decides to pretend to be an agent, and signs up Sparky as a client. She promises to make Sparky rich and famous.  She will debut his new song at Peter Platter's upcoming talent contest.

Unfortunately for her, Benita's song bombs, and the Bugaloos come to Sparky’s rescue.




This episode of Sid and Marty Krofft’s The Bugaloos (1970) follows the patterns of others very closely.

First, there is an event of some type (sponsored by Peter Platter), and Benita wants in, but needs the Bugaloos (or Sparky) to succeed.

Accordingly, she dresses up in a disguise to trick her victims. Here, Benita pretends to be an agent, G.W. Wooster, in the belief that Sparky can write her a hit song.

The winner, in this case, gets to appear on TV, but of course, things don’t go that far. Benita’s song bombs, and the Bugaloos perform instead, repeating their song, “So It’s New to You.”

The most memorable quality of the episode involves, once again, imported (stolen?) jokes. Here, a character exclaims “You bet your sweet bippy!,” cribbing a catchphrase from Laugh-In (1967-1973). 

Also, the crystal ball that does a Don Adams/Get Smart impersonation recurs in this story.

Otherwise, the jokes are silly puns (Playbug Magazine for instance), and once again, one can’t help but wonder why the Bugaloos bother with Sparky. Once more, he acts like a jerk, and is rude to them. They come to his rescue, of course, and all is forgiven.  But Sparky is a royal pain in the ass, and easily manipulated by Benita.

Next week: “Benita’s Double Trouble.”

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